Saturday, 23 April 2016

Matchy Matchy Millinery



Matching everything is my aim in life! I love a matching outfit, matching accessories, matching the colour of my ensemble with the interior decor of my destination(thank you trip advisor for having pictures of everywhere!) 

 There is something so old Hollywood about being matchy matchy and I'm always looking for new ways to accessorize to match my look. 

Making accessories isn't something I have ventured into before, but making something for yourself gives you so many options to play with. 


You will need-

  • A Sinamay hat base (any shape you fancy)
  • Covering fabric (left over fabric from a garment you have made/altered is fantastic for matching!)
  • Lining fabric
  • Thread (matching colour to fabric)
  • A kettle/ pan of boiling water
  • Scissors
  • A pen/pencil (for drawing template)
  • Pins
  • Paper
  • Bobby pins and/or hair comb
  • Decorative trim/fabric flowers/ ribbon/buttons anything you like the look of.



To create my little hat I used a Sinamay hat base. You can find these hate bases in diferent, fun shape, I chose a tear drop shape.

What I noticed about this particular shape was that it was quite flat, so I needed to add a nice curve to it so that it curves around the head.
The picture above shows the original base above and my shaped base underneath.



There is no fancy way of shaping the base. Just hold the base over the kettle steam to soften and then bend gently with your fingers.

##keep your fingers away from the steam- IT'S HOT!!!##

This took me a couple of times to get right,  I manipulated the base a little and then held it against my head to check if it was right.
A bit of trial and error is needed here.


Draw around the base onto your fabric, leaving roughly a 1 inch seam allowance.

You can use whatever fabric you fancy, though sheer fabrics would need to have a backing fabric. Equally you could leave your base uncovered as the Sinamay is very pretty and summery as it is (and you can get the bases in different colours).


Cut out your fabric.


Using a needle and thread, sew a running stitch around the edge of your fabric shape, roughly 3/8 inch away from the edge.


Once stitched all around your fabric , slightly pull the threads to gather the fabric, forming a cup.


Place your base into your fabric cover.

Make sure the right side of your fabric is facing out.


And pull the threads nicely taut and tie together.


A second row of stitching will help to keep the inside seam allowances flat.
Sew 1/4 inch outside your first stitch line.


Once again, stitch all of the way around, pull taut and tie off your threads.


The shape of this particular hat base has a point at one end that creates bulk once your fabric is gathered in. To help keep things flat, stitch the seam allowances together, just at the very end.

 I used a thick cashmere to cover my hat base and it does cause a certain amount of bulk. Thinner fabrics will not have this problem.


This is the point where you can be creative and add decorative stitching, trimming or accessories to your hat.
Go Wild!!!


To mirror the details of the jacket that this hat matches, I used a running stitch around the edge, going through all layers of the fabric and base.
To create this detail keep your needle vertical, not slanted!


Continue around the entire edge of the hat.


This stitching creates a subtle detailing which is very elegant and understated. 


By stitching my detail through all layers it also had the added benefit of keeping my seam allowances flatter.

I did intend to leave my hat very understated but fuss always wins with me and a massive bow got slapped on top too! Yay!!!


I created the bow with some hand rolled cord. Hand stitched to the base.


Hand stitch on to the hat base as much or little frivolity as you desire!
Keep in mind more is always more!


Use some paper to draw a template, slightly smaller than your hat, approx 1/4 inch from the edge.
  Make the template a fraction longer to accommodate little pleats in the lining, to maintain a nice curve in the fabric. 


Pin your pattern to your fabric (wrong side up)  and cut around your template, leaving roughly 1/2 inch seam allowance.


Iron the edges down all around your template. 


Hand stitch your lining in place, with tiny pleats wherever there is the most curve. 
Use pins to hold the lining in place if necessary.



The only thing left to do is to keep your hat on your head.



Sew little thread loops around the inside edge of your hat to thread bobby pins through to pin to your hair.


The Bobby pins are sufficient to hold the hat in place, though a hair comb shoes anchor everything much better. A combination of the two work really well.
The hair comb is also just hand stitched in place.


And there you have the most matchy, matchy outfit there could ever be!

This project took me about 2 hours on a lazy Sunday afternoon, a nice in between project that offers instant gratification!


X O X O 

Christina

7 comments:

  1. Oo great to see the step-by-step, you make it look very easy!! I'm sure I would fudge my way through and end up with something far less elegant than your creation. Great inspiration though xx

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  2. That is just too cool! You are so talented and creative, sweet Christina. What a beautiful way to quite literally cap off an awesome - and completely beautiful - springtime ensemble. Love!!!

    Big hugs,
    ♥ Jessica

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  3. You definitely make it sound simple, although I have no doubt I'd mess it up royally ;) you really are talented at crafts! It's so impressive. Really, if I had any sense I'd improve, considering how much I love matching... x

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  4. Well done Christina! This looks so great! I really love the whole ensemble.

    xx
    Sandra

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  5. What a wonderful tutorial, this looks so doable! I've also been wanting to make more hats for my wardrobe, I'll have to give this a try :)

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  6. Oh-- thank you for this tutorial! A while back I made one that was similar and gave away- I definitely wish I had it again as I had sewn on quite a few vintage trinkets onto it! Anyway, yours looks a lot better than mine and I'll be using this tutorial in the future! I can see a lot of possibilities for beautiful matching fascinators down the road!

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  7. Oh-- thank you for this tutorial! A while back I made one that was similar and gave away- I definitely wish I had it again as I had sewn on quite a few vintage trinkets onto it! Anyway, yours looks a lot better than mine and I'll be using this tutorial in the future! I can see a lot of possibilities for beautiful matching fascinators down the road!

    ReplyDelete